Anxiety, stress, panic = KABOOM! A good day is ruined, an opportunity is missed, and a whole load of self-loathing follows in the wake of the bad results. Jitters have this bad habit of creeping in at moments when they are not invited at all. You could try to shoo them away but how? They keep bouncing up and down, not even giving you the surface area to kick them out.

Presentation next day or a speech and you’re just not sure how you’ll tamp down that anxiety? You’re at the right place. We’ve collected a to-do list that can help you calm the jitters before the big moment and save you from any potential embarrassment. Oops, you shouldn’t really be thinking about that. Cut that. Let’s move to the answer to the how.

Practice

Practice surely is an annoying word with how it pops up every time. Does no one understand that time is a luxury that you cannot buy and there is just not enough of it for practicing? Well, you don’t really only have to practice standing up and pretending you’re facing a crowd. You can practice when sitting, when lying down, in different positions.

The more comfortable you get with your positioning, the better you will get with your speech. You can also record your progress and pinpoint where you need to work on your speech delivering abilities.

Channel enthusiasm

You don’t have to look graceful and just stick to the eloquence. Sometimes that can be hard work for those who are born with an inner crazy child. Luckily, research shows that often enthusiastically delivered speeches win points over eloquently delivered ones. That said, before you head to the podium, listen to some hip-hop music and guzzle down some caffeine to transform your nervousness into energy.

Daydream

Daydreaming is not as bad as you might think it to be. Imagine yourself giving your best to the audience, think about your pitch, and your posture. Positive visualization will help get your mind off the negative thoughts that are buzzing in your head. You can also think of something entirely else if the anxiety of thinking about your speech is just too much.

Take five

Pressurizing yourself always leads to a mess. So when you feel like the anxiety is overwhelming you, and that the negativity can corrode your remaining senses, take a break. Rest your head on the table in front of you and try to quiet down your mind for a bit. Take deep breaths; this is an old one but its truly effective. Shut your mind and keep your thoughts from barging in for a few minutes.

Drink water

Keep yourself hydrated. Dry throat is a result of extra nervousness that’s drinking your share of water. So keep drinking water at short intervals. Keep a water bottle with yourself at all times, at arm’s length when you are presenting so you can deal with the cotton stuffed down your throat as and when your mouth goes too dry.

Arrive early

So it’s finally the big day and you have to stand in front of a huge crowd. It’s better if you arrive early and access the situation. See what sort of a crowd awaits you, if there are any potential factors that can irritate you and contribute to increasing your nervousness. Engage with people and smile politely but not too much like a manic clown.